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April 20, 2016

Christian Courier: Thinking about your career, can you share a story of a time when you were faced with an obstacle in your work because of your faith?
Lorna Dueck: I do feel that the call we have as Christ-followers to exhibit the fruits of the Spirit affects my column writing at The Globe and Mail significantly. There are many issues I would like to rant and be polemic on, there is a sarcasm and biting wit that would make for energy in a column, but I most often hit delete on these impulses because, in my mind, it is incompatible with Gospel witness.   

Can you share your impetus to build your own media company?
This decision came very reluctantly to me; ultimately it was a “by my Spirit” move upon my heart. I responded to an inner call I believe was from God, a call to tell the story of Canadians and God interacting in all dimensions of life and culture. A few very significant things aligned, which could only have been the work of God in my life; I had been given a broadcast-quality pitch in my voice, and an innate curiosity that was tailor-made for journalism. After a season of working in secular media, being home and raising our two young children, I had been approached, without applying, by 100 Huntley Street and given a daily, live TV platform to be mentored by Canada’s leading broadcast evangelist, David Mainse. After eight years, both David and a generous philanthropist offered me a platform to create an independent media ministry. The Globe and Mail was asking me to be a commentary writer on faith and public life, my denominational president, Dr. Franklin Pyles, agreed to lead a new media charity as our founding board Chair, Preston Manning, served as his co- chair, and, well, with a prayer team of 40 people, the media charity has grown.   

What changes have you seen in the media landscape regarding religion?
I think the entertainment and advertising world of media is the most influential dimension of the media landscape. I’d like to quote from Prof. John Stackhouse here, a Canadian expert on culture, who has said it would appear that we have a great need for artists who know their Christian faith deeply, and can infuse that into beautiful craft.

But let me talk next about the media landscape I know best: news and information programming.

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